Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR Table of Contents   
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 217-218
Use of “smartphone” technology for managing workload in transfusion-transmissible infection (nucleic acid testing) laboratory for platelet concentrate inventory management resulting in timely issue of platelets: Experience from a tertiary care center


Department of Transfusion Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

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Date of Web Publication11-Sep-2017
 

How to cite this article:
Hans R, Sharma S, Marwaha N, Sachdev S, Dhawan HK, Jain A, Sharma RR. Use of “smartphone” technology for managing workload in transfusion-transmissible infection (nucleic acid testing) laboratory for platelet concentrate inventory management resulting in timely issue of platelets: Experience from a tertiary care center. Asian J Transfus Sci 2017;11:217-8

How to cite this URL:
Hans R, Sharma S, Marwaha N, Sachdev S, Dhawan HK, Jain A, Sharma RR. Use of “smartphone” technology for managing workload in transfusion-transmissible infection (nucleic acid testing) laboratory for platelet concentrate inventory management resulting in timely issue of platelets: Experience from a tertiary care center. Asian J Transfus Sci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2017 Nov 21];11:217-8. Available from: http://www.ajts.org/text.asp?2017/11/2/217/214340


Sir,

Our institute is a large tertiary care center in North India with multispecialties such as hemato-oncology (pediatric and adult), bone marrow transplant, advanced trauma care, cardiothoracic vascular surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and solid organ transplant units which require platelet concentrates (PCs) for their patients. Our department collects 60,000 whole blood units annually and prepares about 32,000 random donor platelets (RDPs) in addition to 2000 single donor apheresis platelets (SDAPs) to cater demand of large number of patients admitted in different specialties. All the collected whole blood units are subjected to transfusion-transmissible infection screening using semiautomated individual donation (ID) nucleic acid testing (NAT) in addition to the third-generation ELISA. However, the SDAPs are prepared as and when required for the patients and respective donors are screened accordingly by performing rapid tests in duplicate using kits from two different lots.

Daily consumption of RDPs at our center is 80–90 units which increase up to 120–140 during August to October due to dengue cases. Hence, it remains a challenge to maintain the continuous availability of RDPs ready for issuing. Here, we present our experience of ensuring the availability of NAT [1] tested PCs (RDPs) in inventory on day 0 or day 1 of collection to meet the increased demand due to dengue cases in our region.

We prepared a process flow for coordinating the priority of unit numbers to be NAT screened for RDPs prepared in component preparation area out of the total daily donations both in outdoor camps and in-house donations through a text message on closed user WhatsApp Messenger group,[2] where the concerned resident doctors and technologists of component preparation laboratory, blood grouping laboratory, NAT laboratory, and the component issue section were the members. The primary aim of these members was to daily communicate regarding the stock of screened RDPs so as to meet the average requirement of that particular day and also the next morning. This protocol also served as a tool for managing inventory of not only the RDPs but also other blood components.

After acknowledging the text message, the relevant samples were sorted out for the first and second NAT run (batch) of the day as shown in [Figure 1]. The average turnaround time for a single run (batch) of ID-NAT in our set up is 4.5–5 h. In third run (batch), unit numbers of whole blood units collected in triple blood bags from in-house as well as from local camps of that day were included. At the end of all the runs (batches), NAT report was compiled with the results of serology testing which was done in parallel on the same unit numbers, thus generating a common report on hospital information system. This was followed by labeling and marking of the units and changing the status from Quarantine to Ready to Shift which could be shifted to component issue area as per the demand. This coordination resulted in availability of 88% of RDPs of day 1 collection and 10% of RDPs of day 0 collection in the inventory, and 2% got available on day 2 of collection. This resulted in meeting 100% demand for RDPs (both from our institute and from outside hospitals) issuing minimum of 2 units/requisition daily with a backup of 20–30 RDP units in “Ready to Shift” stock which could be asked for, in case of any emergency.
Figure 1: Flow of handling samples for nucleic acid testing

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In conclusion, coordinating RDP unit numbers through smartphone technology (WhatsApp Messenger group) and thus including maximum numbers in the first run (batch) of NAT have helped in maintaining stock in RDP inventory in a high workload setup.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Procleix Ultrio Plus Assay-complete Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT). Available from: http://www.novartisdx.com/products/procleixassays/ultrio-plus.shtml. [Last accessed on 2016 May 05].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Wikipedia. WhatsApp Messenger. Available from: https://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WhatsApp#cite_note-metz-wired-7. [Last accessed on 2016 Dec 06].  Back to cited text no. 2
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Neelam Marwaha
Department of Transfusion Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector-12, Chandigarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajts.AJTS_149_16

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2006 - Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th November, 2006