Asian Journal of Transfusion Science
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR Table of Contents   
Year : 2023  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 143-144
Breakthrough in the scientific world: Lab-grown red blood cells used in transfusions


1 Department of General Medicine, Kakatiya Medical College, Warangal, Telangana, India
2 Department of General Surgery, Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India

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Date of Submission10-Nov-2022
Date of Decision24-Nov-2022
Date of Acceptance04-Dec-2022
Date of Web Publication01-Mar-2023
 

How to cite this article:
Sai Kale SS, Kode R, Kuchana SK, Simhachalam Kutikuppala1 L V. Breakthrough in the scientific world: Lab-grown red blood cells used in transfusions. Asian J Transfus Sci 2023;17:143-4

How to cite this URL:
Sai Kale SS, Kode R, Kuchana SK, Simhachalam Kutikuppala1 L V. Breakthrough in the scientific world: Lab-grown red blood cells used in transfusions. Asian J Transfus Sci [serial online] 2023 [cited 2023 Apr 1];17:143-4. Available from: https://www.ajts.org/text.asp?2023/17/1/143/370933




Sir,

In a fast-paced world like ours, it is inevitable to expect the advancement of laboratory skills and their involvement in clinical research. One such event which has caught the attention of several clinicians is the RESTORE trial. In this trial, red blood cells that have been grown in a laboratory have been transfused into another person requiring that blood. This technique is a pioneer in transferring lab-grown cells to another person as a part of a blood transfusion.[1]


   About the Trial Top


The “RESTORE (Recovery and Survival of Stem Cell Originated Red Cells) trial” is an initiative by the “NHS Blood and Transplant, University of Bristol, National Institute for Health and Care Research Cambridge Clinical Facility,” in association with several other universities.[2] In this trial, the longevity of cells generated in the laboratory is compared to red blood cell injections from the same donor.[3]

The produced blood cells were developed from donor-derived stem cells. Then, these cells were transferred to the volunteers as a part of this randomized control trial. The trial will test how long a mini blood transfusion, up to 2 teaspoons or 10 ml of lab-grown red cells will last in the body compared to the same number of standard cells from the same donor.[3]

Adult stem cells from the donor are used to create lab-grown blood; they are cultured for 18–21 days in a nutritional solution. This promotes cell growth and maturation. Red blood cells need 1–2 teaspoons of nutritional solution, which is 24 L. Six months after the first injection of the cells, volunteers' blood samples can be collected and tested for the presence of these tracer-labeled cells.[4] To support their research, the participants underwent two mini transfusions separated by at least 4 months.[2] The ultimate objective of the study is to produce essential but difficult-to-find blood types.


   Advantages of the Trial Top


This approach is advantageous as it can address the shortage of donors for those with rare blood types. If these patients suffer from blood disorders such as thalassemia and sickle cell disease, they require regular blood transfusions and can receive these fresh, lab-grown cells to meet their needs.[1] Another advantage to be noted is that lab-grown blood cells are expected to last longer and perform better. Overall, this will reduce the frequency of transfusions and avoid iron overload, which occurs when there is excessive iron accumulation in the body due to repeated transfusions.[2]

This research offers hope to those patients who have been facing difficulty in transfusions due to the development of antibodies against donor blood cells. Individuals from minority communities should be taken as volunteers in the future.

It is true that the majority of the blood will be obtained from normal blood donations, but this trial has the potential to benefit hard-to-transfuse patients significantly. Although further trials are needed before clinical use, this research marks a significant step as a breakthrough when it comes to scientific innovation and collaboration while delivering high-quality care to those who need it the most.[1]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
First Ever Clinical Trial of Laboratory Grown Red Blood Cells Being Transfused into Another Person. NHS Blood and Transplant; 2022. Available from: https://www.nhsbt.nhs.uk/news/first-ever-clinical-trial-of-laboratory-grown-red-blood-cells-being-transfused-into-another-person/. [Last accessed on 2022 Nov 10, Last update on 2022 Nov 09].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
RESTORE Clinical Trial. RESTORE Clinical Trial | NIHR Blood and Transplant Research Unit in Red Blood Cell Products | University of Bristol. Available from: https://www.bristol.ac.uk/btru/work/trial/. [Last accessed on 2022 Nov 09, Last update on 2022 Nov 09].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Lab Grown Blood Given to People in World-First Clinical Trial. Cambridge University Hospitals. 2022. Available from: https://www.cuh.nhs.uk/news/lab-grown-blood-given-to-people-in-world-first-clinical-trial/. [Last accessed on 2022 Nov 2022, Last update on 2022 Nov 09].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
New Hope for Sickle Cell Patients as UK Trial of Lab Grown Red Blood cells Begins | Medical Research | The Guardian. New Hope for Sickle Cell Patients as UK Trial of lab Grown Red Blood Cells Begins | Medical Research | The Guardian. Available from: https://amp.theguardian.com/science/2022/nov/07/new-hope-for-sickle-cell-patients-as-uk-trial-of-lab-grown-red-blood-cells-begins. [Last accessed on 2022 Nov 09, Last update on 2022 Nov 10].  Back to cited text no. 4
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
L V Simhachalam Kutikuppala1
Department of General Surgery, Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences, Vijayawada - 533 201, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajts.ajts_148_22

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2006 - Asian Journal of Transfusion Science | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 10th November, 2006