Asian Journal of Transfusion Science

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 31--36

Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program


Rahul Vasudev, Vijay Sawhney, Mitu Dogra, Tilak Raj Raina 
 Departement of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion Medicine, Government Medical College, Jammu, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Correspondence Address:
Rahul Vasudev
259 Sec 1, Channi Himmat Housing Colony, Jammu - 180 015, Jammu and Kashmir
India

Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties is the need of the hour and it will help in making the whole transfusion chain safe and effective. There is a need for a hemovigilance program at the national level so that true incidence and the spectrum of adverse events due to transfusion are known and policies formulated to minimize the risks associated with it.


How to cite this article:
Vasudev R, Sawhney V, Dogra M, Raina TR. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program.Asian J Transfus Sci 2016;10:31-36


How to cite this URL:
Vasudev R, Sawhney V, Dogra M, Raina TR. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program. Asian J Transfus Sci [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Sep 23 ];10:31-36
Available from: https://www.ajts.org/article.asp?issn=0973-6247;year=2016;volume=10;issue=1;spage=31;epage=36;aulast=Vasudev;type=0